Gear List - Russia Expedition

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We were given a gear list from the planning team of what we needed to bring, I followed most of it with a few additions. With a slightly last minute rucksack purchase after realising my 60l bag was going to be too much of a squeeze I opted for the Fjallraven Kajka 75l - it ended up being a very good rash decision. 

Kit list 

Sleeping

  • 75l Fjallraven Rucksack 3.5kg
  • Haiti Futura 30M down sleeping bag 1.4kg
  • Therm-a-Rest Z Lite Mattress 0.3kg
  • Haiti silk liner 0.1kg
  • Vihe Vaellus Loue I Shelter 0.8kg
  • 3x5 tarp sheet 

Clothing 

  • 3x wollen socks
  • 3x liner socks
  • 1x wool technical socks
  • 1x merino wool pants
  • 1x merino wool bottoms
  • 1x merino wool top
  • 1x technical long sleeve top
  • 1 x technical leggings
  • 1 x North Face hard shell pants
  • 1 x Haglofs softshell
  • 1 x Patagonia fleece
  • 1 x Trespass Hard shell jacket
  • 1 x woollen gloves
  • 2x buffs
  • 3x underwear 
  • 1x wool hat

Cooking Gear 

  • MSR Pocket rocket stove
  • 2x cooking pots + 1 lid
  • Gas canister 
  • 1x spoon
  • 3x matches 
  • 1x lighter 
  • 1x sponge
  • Hand sanitiser 
  • 1x cup

General Gear

  • 2x pukko (knife)
  • 1 x Suunto compass
  • 1 x Siva mapcase
  • Small first aid kit
  • Petzl head torch
  • 2x spare batteries for head torch 
  • Tarp repair kit
  • Sewing kit
  • Small Swiss army knife
  • extra torch 
  • travel towel

 

Food

Then I had about 10-12kg of food packed. I had a food buddy, Markus who I shared a few communal things with, I carried most of the food and he had the saw and an axe. I dried some of our food to help make it lighter but had a last minute panic and brought some extra cans of tuna and pasta incase it wasn't very nice. 

Drying food 

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In order to cut down on the weight of my bag I wanted to try drying some food, I tested a few trays of vegetables, just simple things we could add to the more basic meals to liven them up a bit. Then I also made a chilli, I read on camp food blog that adding breadcrumbs is useful when drying food in order to keep the flavour in. So I could a big pot of chilli and spread it over 3 trays, there in a drying rack already in our house here but you can also use the oven on a really low temperature (Ideally below 50) then I let it dry for about 8/9 hours. Checking it half way and separating any big clumps.

On day 3, after our longest/wettest day we needed a pick me up and Markus was super keen to try out the chilli (I for some reason was super sceptical about it because it looked so gross in its ziplock bag) but we added it to a boiling pot of water, and actually it was bloody delicious. Who knows if it was the 'type 2 fun' induced appreciation but at that moment it tasted divine. 

So I will defiantly be drying a lot more meals for future trips, I really recommend it, Its wayyyyy cheaper than those freeze dried meals from the shops and they taste better so win win! Food wise we judged it fairly well, we had some excess carbs left over and stretched our meat/protein out just long enough. Things I would do differently next time:

  1. Take more/varied snacks - sweet & savoury 
  2. Take more dried meat/ salami/chorizo or something 
  3. Take sugar/jam to add to porridge! Plain porridge sucks.
  4. Parmesan is the best. Especially in mashed potatoes
  5. Don't take food you don't normally like/eat.

 

Read about how the whole trip went down below